Now accepting Telehealth appointments. Schedule a virtual visit.

Four Common Types of Heart Disease

Four Common Types of Heart Disease

Everyone should be concerned about heart disease. As the leading cause of death in the US, heart disease is a collection of conditions that impact the heart and blood vessels. More than 650,000 people die of heart disease each year. It’s never too early or too late to take care of your heart health. 

Board-certified by the American Board of Nuclear Cardiology, Sam Morayati, MD, is devoted to helping individuals live healthy, happy lives. If you have heart disease, it’s important to work closely with a health care provider to manage your condition. For those who don’t have heart disease, you can take steps to protect your heart health and reduce the risk of developing heart disease. 

In this post, our experts discuss four of the most common types of heart disease. 

Coronary artery disease

Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the most common type of heart disease and the leading cause of death among men and women in the US. In most cases, CAD is preventable. Your heart receives its own blood supply from the coronary arteries, which are two major arteries that branch off from the aorta.

CAD occurs when the coronary arteries become stiff, thick, and narrow. This disrupts the flow of nutrient-rich oxygen to the heart. CAD develops very slowly, typically over the course of decades. This gives you a window of opportunity to make the changes necessary to prevent coronary artery disease.

Heart failure

Heart failure develops when the heart is unable to pump enough blood to meet the body's needs. In some cases, the heart is unable to fill up with enough blood, and in other cases, the heart is too weak to pump blood efficiently. 

This does not mean that your heart has stopped working. Heart failure may develop suddenly or the heart may get weaker over time. In most cases, heart failure is caused by an underlying condition that affects the heart, such as coronary artery disease, high blood pressure, and irregular heartbeat.

Heart valve disease

Your heart relies on valves to keep blood flowing in the right direction. The heart has four valves: mitral, tricuspid, pulmonary, and aortic.

The valves have flaps that open and close each time the heartbeats. Heart valve disease occurs when one or more of the heart valves don't work as they should. Problems with the heart’s valves can cause blood to flow backward and leak back into the chambers instead of flowing forward in the right direction into the heart, or an artery.

Cardiomyopathy

There are many types of cardiomyopathy, which refers to diseases of the heart muscle. Most commonly the heart muscle becomes enlarged, thick, and stiff. Over time the heart muscle weakens and is unable to pump enough blood through the body, which can lead to heart failure. Some people are born with cardiomyopathy, while in other cases it develops due to other issues.

You have the power to protect your heart health. Many people with heart disease live long, healthy lives. Your provider can help you lead a heart-healthy lifestyle. To get started, call our office and speak with one of our knowledgeable team members to schedule a visit with Dr. Morayati, MD, or book online today. 

You Might Also Enjoy...

When Should I See a Doctor for Chest Pain?

Angina is a common symptom of an underlying condition, such as coronary artery disease. A heart health checkup can get to the bottom of your symptoms and pave the way for treatment.

Myths and Facts About Angina

Even though angina is common, it can be difficult to distinguish from other types of chest pain, such as heartburn. Keep reading to learn more about angina, and find out why this condition might need medical attention.

Warning Signs You Have High Blood Pressure

High blood pressure is sneaky. You may not know it’s high until it silently causes significant damage. Visit a doctor to have your blood pressure checked and take steps to manage high blood pressure.

Understanding Metabolism

Metabolic disorders affect the way your body processes energy and require you to make some changes to compensate.